Photographs

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Click to see picture A bad insulator spelled the death for the 600 foot tower. The WPIC tower had many more problems than the bad insulator, that was just the last straw. It was nearly 60 years old and lack of maintenance over the years caused severe deterioration. Two years ago a tower crew refused to paint it or climb it again. They brought down photos of cross braces that were totally rusted off, missing bolts, etc. So its days were numbered anyway by foolish neglect on the part of management. They weren't even able to salvage anything off the tower such as lighting, RPU antennas, the FM antenna, etc because nobody would climb it. The old 102.9 FM antenna was atop the tower but their primary site was moved a few years ago to the new studio tower in Youngstown. This site was the backup. No more. The FM antenna is now buried in 4 feet of muck. Now they have no backup. Good thinking. Author and friends.
Click to see picture WMIB Radio. Picture 2, and picture 3. Sent in by Phil Beckman, philbeckman@earthlink.net. Photos by Paul Smith, paul@amtower.com
Click to see picture WYMM 5900 Picketville Rd, Jacksonville, FL. Pictures by Ron Gitschier. Control Room. WYMM Engineer Don Flemming installing relays in phasor cabinet. WYMM 1530's Optimod 9100 on duty. WYMM 1530's backup transmitter, a 1,000 watt CCA AM1000D. 1530 started out with 1kw daytime... WNNR 970 has the same backup transmitter model. A factory spec sheet when testing the transmitter dated 1976. Towers.
Click to see picture All day, every day, all time, all the time. Picture 2.
Click to see picture Ron Gitschier June 2002 Roatan, Honduras, Caribbean Sea. "Forget the fishing poles. Bring the loop and some blank tape." Working daytime saltwater path AM on a R/S DX-398.
Click to see picture Any doubt that UHF skips? Here is a screen shot of the ID at 5:59 on 12/1/2002 from Mark Richmond of Dryden, MI. Mark uses a 7-foot Channel Master parabolic antenna, and a WinTV card.
Click to see picture Mark Durenberger's beverage site, looking out along the antenna: (pic 1 and pic 2, which are both shots of the beverage site). Mark's "wire stretcher" helps make a short vertical into a long-wire antenna "wire-stretcher". DXing on the Kaibab Plateau in northern Arizona (nite jpeg). How to transport a large roll of beverage wire.
Click to see picture Seen here is Jerry Starr at the ex-WHOT night transmitter site. Jerry called me and said the site was disabled, and equipment was being discarded. "You want the old WHOT transmitter?". Needless to say, I drove to Youngstown OH! Jim Hartzler, CE of Clear Channel Youngstown, set the cart up to pull out the ITA AM-1000. Jerry Starr takes off the output insulator from the phasor. I got my first look at the inside. Wes Boyd, an NRC member, was the CE of WHOT-1330. I backed up the truck to the door, and the transmitter was hauled out. Last time this transmitter saw daylight was 1964 when it came in the door. Now it's out. Will the truck hold it? Heck yes! Fred is now the owner of the old WHOT transmitter. Jerry Starrt (L), Fred Vobbe (C), and Jim Hartzler (R), pose before the TX heads to Lima. Although dirty, this transmitter will be cleaned and put into top band ham service. The WHOT night facility is now SK
Click to see picture John Bowker of Tampa FL (Sun City Center) in his home studio.
Click to see picture Kevin Redding at work at the local FOX TV affiliate in Mesa AZ..
Click to see picture DX and broadcast information history was made in Dallas, Texas, in October 2002 when Scott Fybush, left, of Rochester, New York, and Chip Kelly, of Plano, Texas, met face-to-face for the first time. Kelly is the founder of the Internet site, 100000watts, that provides detailed information, including transmitter site maps, for every radio station in the United States and Canada. Fybush this past summer became the editor of the valuable site when M Street Journal took over the operation and selected NRC'er Fybush to edit the website. Fybush and DX'er/Webmaster Garrett Wollman of Boston were in Dallas partly to tour and photograph broadcasting tower sites. They were carted around the North Texas Metroplex by NRC-Big D-2003 convention host Wally Wawro, accompanied by NRC'er John Callarman, whose camera captured the meeting outside the KRLD transmitter site. The first in a series of pictures of the unique transmitter sites in the Dallas-Fort Worth area can be found at Scott's website: http://www.fybush.com/featuredsite.html. Photo by John Callarman - Krum TX
Click to see picture Front row, left to right: Ralph Johanns, Ray Edge, Eldon Eddy, Dick Cooper, Ernie Cooper and Carroll Seth. Backrow: Sully Sullivan, Bob Spencer, Tom Carberry (Ray Edge's son-in-law), Pat Reilley, probably Hal Wagner peeking behind Reilley; Joe Pelletier (with someone hidden behind him), Len Kruse, one of the unidentified DX'ers, Relfe Luton, Bob Brown and Joe Brauner. Photo by Chuck Hutton
Click to see picture Large Image - This is a 1940 photo of the WFAA/WBAP transmitter site. Located near Grapevine, TX, the location was removed in the early 1970's to allow for the construction of the Dallas Fort-Worth International Airport. (via: Wally Wawro)
Click to see picture Large Image - This is a photo of a performance studio at KGKO-570, Fort Worth, TX. KGKO was moved from Wichita Falls, TX in the late 1930's. KGKO later became part of the famed split frequency operation of WFAA-WBAP 570/820. (via: Wally Wawro)
Click to see picture Large Image - He're an article about KGKO from the 1940 WFAA/WBAP/KGKO family album. (via: Wally Wawro)
Click to see picture Large Image - How did they do it? This 1963 program schedule documents WFAA's programming on both 570 (Melodic Living) and 820 (Southwest Central). 820 Programming is highlighted in red. If you look carefully at the bottom of the right hand side of the schedule, you'll note the name "Ted Cassidy." This is the same Ted Cassidy that played the part of "Lurch" on the Addams Family! Mr. Cassidy is deceased. (via: Wally Wawro)
Click to see picture East meets west at the 1967 National Radio Club convention in Eugene, Oregon. Conferring are Wayne Plunkett of Toronto, Ontario, and Gordon Gray of Spokane, Washington. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Bill Block, left, of Portland, Oregon, attended many NRC and IRCA conventions. The 1967 NRC convention at Eugene, Oregon, was the closest to home. Here, he confers with another veteran convention goer, the late Leonard Lockwood of Olympia, Washington. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Convention hosts Bart Cronin, left, and Mike Northam, center, chat with Dave Bennett, an NRC'er from British Columbia at the 1967 NRC convention in Eugene, Oregon. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Bob LaMotte, a California DX'er, was active in the National Radio Club in the '50s and '60s. Here, he looks over some verifications and other material at the 1967 NRC convention in Eugene, Oregon. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Easterners who attended the National Radio Club convention in Eugene, Oregon, in 1967, got an opportunity to meet DX'ers who had been known by name only. Here, from left, are two Californians, Don Kaskey and Bob Pietsch, and a Washingtonian, Gordon Gray. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Gordon Nelson, center, plots a Great Circle Path on a globe at the 1967 National Radio Club convention in Eugene, Oregon. Other DX'ers pictured, from left, are Gene Allen of Vallejo, California; Floridian Ron Schatz; Don Kaskey of Sacramento; and Bob Pietsch, another Californian. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Gordon Gray of Pullman, Washington; Dave Bennett of British Columbia; and Bart Cronin, convention host, are pictured at the Eugene, Oregon, National Radio Club convention in 1967. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Ron Schatz, center, of Florida, examines one of the exhibits at the 1967 National Radio Club convention in Eugene, Oregon. Californians Gene Mattocks, left, and Gene Allen, right, scan the display table. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Convention host Bart Cronin, right, registers NRC IDXD Editor Gordon Nelson of Watertown, Mass., at the 1967 National Radio Club convention in Eugene, Oregon. Nelson, who lived a mile farther east from photographer John Callarman, also of Watertown, Mass., came the longest distance to the convention. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Gordon Nelson and Ron Schatz confer at the National Radio Convention in Eugene, Oregon, in 1967. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Ruth Nelson accompanied husband Gordon all the way across the country from Watertown, Mass., to Eugene, Ore., for the 1967 National Radio Club Convention. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Yesterday I deployed a serious Beverage antenna, in the desert in Eastern Utah. Had enough stakes to go 1850 feet. Got mixed results; lots of Auroral conditions, but the antenna DID work; it beat the snot out of a good Kiwa loop. KSTP/WCCO etc, mid-day! Look at basic equipment, and the stake line. The copper spool delivered 12 radials for the counterpoise; each radial 300 feet long (the center of the band of interest was about 1000 khz). The counterpoise DID make a difference in this environment, where the ground is not very conductive. A look at the 1850' wire line. Note "anchors" (furring strips) every 250 feet. Wire was adjusted in slots on plastic fence posts, to compensate for terrain variations. Stakes are every 50 feet. The wire's there, honest! Close-up of equipment including the LC test jig. Also note the balun matchbox with separate 4:1 and 9:1 transformers, to match the Beverage self-impedance to the low-impedance input of the Sony 2010. No combination of balun, either step-up or step down, worked nearly as well as a direct connection from Beverage to Sony. The baluns provided NO noise improvement at this outdoor location. The L/C combination was to be used to see whether the antenna was truly acting as a wave antenna or whether it thought it was a series-fed long wire. Since we couldn't resonate it, we feel comfortable that it was indeed acting as Sir Harold Beverage said it should. Note the Sony minidisk for memorializing info, and coffee for staying alert against the dreaded prairie dogs. The Minidisk had radio on one channel; mike on the other. Equipment relative to Beverage line. The Beverage line's far straighter than it looks from this angle! T'was a nice day.70 degrees and the sun was warm, but not harsh. The water was welcome. I figure I walked 7 or 9 miles, back and forth, in laying this out. Photos by Mark Durenberger 10/28/2001.
Click to see picture Two tower array of WLSP-1530 in Lapeer MI, located on Morris Rd. 10/30/01 @ 12:01PM. Tower is not leaning. The field is so overgrown I had to open the lens to 28mm.
Click to see picture Transmitter building of WLSP-1530 in Lapeer MI, located on Morris Rd. STL antenna points to their studios on Neppessing Street in Lapeer. Stick antenna appears to be some sort of VHF-HI communications.
Click to see picture Two tower array of WLSP-1530 in Lapeer MI, located on Morris Rd. 10/30/01 @ 12:04PM.
Click to see picture Tech room at WLIO-TV. Rack on left is WRN on top, and control/PS for KPH-703 & WPLP548. Rack on right is W8HDU/R on 53.530, 145.370, and 443.625. White server is for IRLP, black server is EchoStation.
Click to see picture Tech room at WLIO-TV. Picture 2. Echostation feeds "ARN" and "Rain", as well as IDs. Link controller. Transmitters are behind black screens.
Click to see picture Ron Gitchier holding instruction manual teaching a younger sailor how to bring a ships service 1MW generator on the line, April 2000 onboard USS Doyle, FFG-39.
Click to see picture Here is "Little Ron" (Ron Gitchier son), doing what daddy taught him to do? New DXer, or the next Rush Limbaugh?
Click to see picture Ron Gitchier at WQAI in October 1997 (1570khz 5kw, Fernandina Beach, FL) hosting a auction show. McMartin board in use.
Click to see picture We know radio does not really pay, (but it's fun), so here is Ron's real job. Protecting the U.S.
Click to see picture Ron taking a module out of WGSR's transmitter. Note the Orban 9200 handling the audio just fine, telemetrics unit, extra processor, etc. September 26, 2000.
Click to see picture This picture is of WGSR Radio, 1570.
Click to see picture This is a shot of the studio now, WGSR 1570 less the satellite and EBS equipment which is immediately to the left. Shot November, 2000.
Click to see picture From Bill Hale...Attached is scanned two-page article from the May 23, 1959 TV Guide. Frank Aden of Boise found the book at a flea market.
Click to see picture View of WCRW AM 1240 antenna on top of the building at 2756 N. Pine Grove, Chicago, Illinois. WCRW photos by Christos Rigas, Wood Dale, IL
Click to see picture Closer view of WCRW antenna. WCRW was absorbed by WSBC on July 1996.
Click to see picture View of WPNA AM 1490 antenna on top of Oak Park Arms, 408 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, Illinois. WPNA photos by Christos Rigas, Wood Dale, Illinois
Click to see picture Another view of WPNA AM 1490.
Click to see picture An original copy of the KPO San Francisco CA station licence, dated October 30, 1928. KPO is now KNBR-680 in San Francisco.
Click to see picture Jeff Multer of Fort Mill, SC, sends some pictures of the WBT-1110 transmitter site after a hurricane ripped through the site. Pic 2, pic 3, pic 4, pic 5, pic 6.
Click to see picture Picture of Las Vegas FM/TV stations on the mountain. Shot with Canon Rebel EOS-G 800mm lens from Riveria Hotel, 3 miles away. Just xmtr site. Photo by Fred Vobbe
Click to see picture WCBS-880 New York tower, black & white from the distance. Submitted by Robert Foxworth. Larger image, 720k
Click to see picture WCBS-880 New York tower, black & white looking up from bottom of tower. Submitted by Robert Foxworth. Larger image, 720k
Click to see picture Fred Vobbe meets up with Bob Keeshan (Captain Kangaroo) at the National Association of Broadcaster's Convention in Las Vegas. Photo submitted by Fred Vobbe
Click to see picture Fred also met up with Jonathan Marks and Diane Janssen (ex: Media Network) at the 1999 National Association of Broadcaster's Convention in Las Vegas. Photo submitted by Fred Vobbe
Click to see picture Ernie Wesolowski takes a picture of Fred Vobbe taking a picture of Ernie Wesolowski at the NRC 1999 Convention. Photo by Fred Vobbe
Click to see picture Taken in Robert Foxworth's backyard in 1974/75 (they did print it reversed left to right, actually), with Frank Dailey, Paul Mount, Ron Musco (shown here indicating a typical response), and Tom Sundstrom (sunglasses, face half visible). Submitted by Robert Foxworth.
Click to see picture The John Daller ladies-room picture from St louis-1969 convention. Submitted by Robert Foxworth.
Click to see picture WYLL AM 1160 - Chicago, IL. The 4-tower array behind St. John's Greek Orthodox Church in Des Plaines, IL (I-294 and Ballard RD.). Ex-WXRT, WSCR, WJJD. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture WBBM AM 780 transmitter building in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. WBBM's main and auxilliary tower. Another view of WBBM's towers. Photo by Christos Rigas
Click to see picture WBEE AM 1570, Harvey, Illinois. Transmitter building in Markham, Illinois (I-294 and 159th Street). WBEE's 3-tower array at the Markham, IL transmitter site. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture WGN AM 720 transmitter site located on the border between Elk Grove Village, IL and Schaumburg, IL. WGN's main and auxilliary towers. Photo by Christos Rigas
Click to see picture WMVP AM 1000 Chicago, IL. Transmitter building in Downers Grove, IL. Ex-WCFL, WLUP. The transmitter building still has the WCFL calls displayed, even though WCFL changed to WLUP in 1987. WMVP's 3-tower array. Another view of WMVP's 3-tower array and transmitter building. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture WNVR AM 1030 - Vernon Hills, IL. View of antenna tower behing Arrowood Pet Cemetery in Vernon Hills, IL. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture WVON, WCEV AM 1450 - Cicero, IL. Antenna tower for this shared frequency operation located at 3350 South Kedzie in Chicago, IL. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture 1953 Convention: Bill Moser, Don Kaskey, Barry Foote, host Sid Rosenbaum, Len Kruse, Pete Taylor, Ernie Cooper. Submitted by Pete Taylor.
Click to see picture 1953 Convention: Warren Routzahn, Ev Johnson, Bob Seifert*, Pete Taylor, Len Kruse, Bill Prater, UNKNOWN, Sid Rosenbaum, UNKNOWN. Submitted by Pete Taylor. *Courtesy Gregg Seifert, Pete's son.
Click to see picture 1953 Convention. Barry Foote, Warren Routzahn, Don Kaskey, Bill Moser. Submitted by Pete Taylor.
Click to see picture Here is a picture of a young Ernie "Lefty" Cooper, obviously taking down details for a reception report. This picture was taken in 1953. Submitted by Pete Taylor.
Click to see picture NRC member Joe Brauner, taken in Wheeling, WV in 1953. Submitted by Pete Taylor.
Click to see picture 1110-WMBI-Chicago, IL. The antenna tower for WMBI-AM and WMBI-FM in Addison, Illinois (Army Trail Road & Mill Road). Picture taken by Christos Rigas in 1992.
Click to see picture 670 - WSCR - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. Transmitter building on Army Trail Road in Bloomingdale, Illinois, still sporting the WMAQ logo. Photo by Christos Rigas in February 2001..
Click to see picture 670 - WSCR - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. The main and auxilliary tower at Army Trail Road in Bloomingdale, Illinois. The main tower also serves as the antenna for the FM station WLEY - 107.9 FM. Picture taken by Christos Rigas in February 2001.
Click to see picture 1220 - WKRS - Waukegan, Illinois. The antennas for WKRS-AM, WXLC - 102.3 FM, as well as the studio and transmitter buildings located at 3250 Belvidere Road in Waukegan, IL. Photo by Christos Rigas.
Click to see picture I recieved this QSL for a daytime reception report from Lowell, Massachusetts in 1982. Radio was a Panasonic RF 1150. The photo is of their tower site in Avon, CT.
Click to see picture "WKNM" 1570, Central St. corner of Elm St., Lowell, MA Nov.17, 2001-- Suspected Pirate Station. Plays Portugese music, local advertisments and comminuty announcements in Portugese. 2nd picture. Photo by Ron Gitschier.
Click to see picture WGIR 610 Manchester, NH. Image looking from north to south of the four triangular inline towers on Stark Lane, Manchester, NH. November 18, 2001. Array located at Exit 7 of I-293, Everett Turnpike NH Hwy 3A Hooksett interchange. Photo by Ron Gitschier.
Click to see picture Here is the antenna array for WWMI 1380 kc. They use 5 kw day and night, with the guyed center red and white painted huge 225 degree 5/8's tower used for daytime omnidirectional. Extreme left and right are self supporting 90 degree towers, with all three used for the night time pattern. The unpainted free standing tower is for the microwave relay to WTSP 10's transmit tower near Tarpon Springs and the Gulf Of Mexico. The station broadcasts a Radio Disney kids format. Many years ago this station was a big tine rock and roller using the C/S WLCY. Photos by Thomas Giella, KN4LF
Click to see picture I was over in Pinellas County again today and got photo's of WTAN 1340 kc 1000/1000 Clearwater. They have a single almost 1/4 wave stick (78.1 degrees) and it is a brand new self supporting tower and the transmitter building is also brand new. Tower | Original studio/transmitter site | Tower | Transmitter building through fence | Leftover ground system from original tower. Photos by Thomas Giella, KN4LF
Click to see picture I was over in Pinellas County again today and got photo's of WLVU 1470 kc 5000/500 Dunedin. They have a single 1/4 wave stick (88.1 degrees) and it looks very old. The transmitter building and ex studio are pretty old too. This station broadcasts business info. Pic-2 | Pic-3. Photos by Thomas Giella, KN4LF
Click to see picture Far view of towers looking east towards Tampa. You drive between the two towers on U.S. 92/Gandy Bridge/Causeway. Closer view of towers looking east towards Tampa. North tower, old studio and transmitter building. South tower on dock in Tampa Bay. North tower. North tower 2nd pic. North tower 3rd pic. South tower. South tower. Photos by Thomas Giella, KN4LF
Click to see picture Picture of Jerry Starr from the 1976 National Radio Club Convention in Louisville KY. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture FLEISCHAKER, the Earth Shaker -- Ted Fleischaker, one of our affable hosts at the 1976 Louisville convention, got sidetracked as a led a group of fellow NRC members on foot toward Churchill Downs, home of the Kentucky Derby. He thought it would be fun to drive a steam drill and, since Americans weren't quite is litiguous in 1976 as they are today, the work crew allowed him to do so. Photo by John Callarman
Click to see picture Musings Editor Ernie Cooper had been distressed at previous NRC conventions when he was told the dress code for the convention banquet required a necktie. To the 1976 convention at Louisville, Ernie came prepared. Photo by John Callarman
Click to see picture The 1976 Louisville National Radio Club convention banquet brought out a heavy hitting main speaker to the podium. FCC Commissioner Robert E. Lee, right, ponders what to say to the most important people among the commission's customers, DX'ers. Master of Ceremonies Ted Fleischaker, left, would introduce Congressman George Mazzuli, center, who would in turn introduce Commissioner Lee. No pranks were played on the Commissioner and the Congressman ... and WNRC had not yet been invented. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Don Erickson, left, prepares to capture on film the auction of a Hammarlund Super-Pro SP-600 donated to the NRC convention in St. Louis in 1979. Chicago firefighter Hugh McDermott, a silent NRC'er for several years, surprised us all by bringing the receiver and donating it to the club. Auctioneer Ted Fleischaker, center, and covention host ... Buehler hold the receiver high. Does anyone remember who had the winning bid? I don't, and I didn't. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Jim Critchett of San Diego, Calif., was one of several NRC'ers who reported reception of the first DX Test John Callarman did, from Corvallis, Oregon in 1956. We launched a long-time correspondence, Polley Critchett took this picture and noted on the back "James is the one on the left." Callarman and Critchett visited in San Diego in 1958, and enjoyed several encounters at NRC convetions. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Hugh McDermott had been an NRC member for several years, but his name showed up in the bulletin only at renewal time. Thus, it was a surprise when the Chicago firefighter came to the St. Louis convention in 1979 with a Hammarlund Super-Pro he donated to the convention auction. It's one of my top convention memories, though I wasn't a competitive bidder. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Don Reynolds of the greater Los Angeles area was one of several active DX'ers who reported regularly to Fred Van Voorhees' DX Down the Dial column in the NRC bulletin in the middle to late 1950s. John Callarman took this picture of Don's neat DX'ing arrangement on a six-week bus trip around the West Coast after discharge from the Army. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture John Callarman, after his discharge from the Army in 1956, took a six-week bustrip from the Panhandle of Texas to the West Coast. He'd planned to stop and visit DX'ers, then sleep on the bus. But at his first stop in Albuquerque, long-time NRC'er Norm Maguire (W5NXF) insisted he spend the night. Norm, John and Larry Godwin later enjoyed a weekend of DX in Norm's mobile home high in the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque. Norm impressed John with his collection of 34 BCB veries from Japanese stations, a feat that so impressed one Japanese broadcaster he made it a point to stop in Albuquerque and visit with Norm. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Raleigh Biss started DX'ing in the '20s in Minnesota and later moved to Palm Springs, California, where he was involved in installing hi-fi and other electronic equipment in residents' homes. He told John Callarman on his 1958 West Coast bus trip that among the homes in which he'd made installations was that of orchestra leader Andre Kostelanetz and his wife, opera singer Lily Pons. Raleigh was a good NRC supporter and attended several Labor Day weekend conventions. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture What a trio. John Callarman of Canyon, Texas, left ... Ted Vasilopolous, center, and John Alexander, right, visit at Vasilopolous' home in 1958. Ted built his own radio from scratch and was such a DX purist, he didn't consider a station logged unless he had 30 minutes of program detail. Alexander became well known in ham DX circles as K6SVL and, in the '80s before Alexander's death, Callarman, KA9SPA, paused in a ham contest QSO to remined the former NRC'er of their 1958 meeting. Ted's wife took this picture in John Callarman's collection. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Another prominent contributor to Fred Van Voorhees, Pete Taylor and John Callarman as editors of International DX Digest in the '50s and '60s was Hank Wilkinson, of North Hollywood CA in 1958 and later of San Raphael or Santa Rosa, one of those north bay area towns. John Callarman took this picture of Hank's DX site in June 1958. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Here's another pic of John Alexander, left, and Ted Vasilopolous in Ted's garage in the Los Angeles area, where Ted had set up his DX den. Alexander had DX'ed from St. Albans, West Virginia, before moving to California, and he told John Callarman in 1958 that he drew some skepticism from NRC'ers for his reports of reception of a number of Central Europeans people didn't believe could be heard that far inland. He said he had tied his antenna lead-in to a long wire-fence outside his rural location, back before the BCB DX'ing community (except in New Zealand) had embraced the Beveridge antenna. Vasilopolous was an NRC'er who livened up IRCA conventions to such an extent that IRCA named an annual award to the convention attendee from the farthest distance in his honor. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Three NRC'ers in 1957 contributed regularly to Fred Van Voorhees International DX Digest from foreign locations as a result of service assignments. John Callarman, stationed in Aschaffenburg, Germany, collected a lot of nice QSLs from European and African stations. At the same time, Coast Guardsman Pete Taylor was DX'ing from Hawaii and shipboard in the South Pacific and Air Force Sergeant Jack Hathaway was DX'ing from Tegucigalpa, Honduras, where he drew embassey duty. Jack's last military assignment was at Amarillo AFB, where Callarman introduced him to John's father, Dean of Business at West Texas State, and they arranged a course to get Jack the last credits he needed for his master's degree. In late 1966, Pete Taylor hired John Callarman, then at KILT in Houston, to help put news/talk WCAS-740, Cambridge, Mass., on the air, leading to the first Boston Publishing Committee. 87th Inf Reg. PIO photo from John Callarman's collection
Click to see picture NRC'ers John Callarman, left, and Bernard J.C. Brown visited in Derby, England, in October, 1957, while John was stationed with the U.S. Armey in Aschaffenburg, Germany. Brown was publisher of the Medium Wave Circle bulletin at the time, edited by another NRC'er, Ken Brownless. We also visited NRC'er Roy Patrick, who was in charge of lighting and other electronic details backstage at a Derby theater that featured live performances. We were not allowed backstage and had to talk at the stage door because there was a nudie show that night and, while it was OK for the audience to see the girls in stationary pose with the curtain open, it was against the rules for outsiders to see them moving around backstage. Callarman published one issue of MWC's Medium Wave News in 1957 from the Public Information Office in Germany when Brown had another commitment at deadline time. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture After Pete Taylor had hired John Callarman, left, to help put WCAS-740 Cambridge, Mass., on the air, Callarman drove from KILT, Houston, TX, to Cambridge after Christmas, 1966. He stopped at Kittanning PA to visit with one of the really nicest people in the NRC, Dick Cooper. Dick had published the NRC bulletin in 1964, after Ray Edge relinquished the job, and prior to turning it over to Callarman and the first Boston Publishing Committee. It was on this simple mimeograph machine, first in Dick Cooper's attic and then in an apartment in Watertown, Mass., shared by Callarman and Bob Karchevski, that thousands of pages of NRC bulletins were printed, prior to the club's going offset when Gordon Nelson took over after Callarman's marriage in July 1968. Dick's wife took this picture in John Callarman's collection. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture It was purely coincidence and not a recruiting drive that shortly after John Callarman moved to Canyon, Texas, 17 miles south of Amarillo, following two years in the Army, that several new members joined the National Radio Club from Amarillo. Here, Callarman, left, and high schoolers Jeff Stewart, center, and Larry Godwin gab about DX. Among others joining the club at about the same time were Ross Harp, Jr., and John Tudenham. About the same time, Jack Hathaway was transferred from embassey duty in Honduras to Amarillo AFB. Amarillo, for a time, was a BCB DX hotbed and was site of the 1961 NRC convention. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture We generally thought of 1976 as the bicentennial year, but at the National Radio Club convention in Louisville, it must have been the year of the beard. Picture No. 1 is from Ralph Walker whom, I think, was one of the Louisville locals then. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture The second in my series of Year of the Beard pictures from the 1976 Louisville Convention features the hirsute splendor of Glenn Hauser, then of Knoxville, Tennessee. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture I haven't seen old friend Russ Edmunds in person since the 1976 Louisville convention. I wonder how his image has changed? Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Another in our half dozen examples of luxuriant facial growth that marked the height of bicentennial fashion is that of one-time NRC'er Dave Hammer, who, if memory serves correctly, was from Columbus, Ohio. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Four NRC'ers came to the 1979 convention in St. Louis from the Pacific Northwest. Lined up in their uniforms are Bill Block of Portland and Rich Segalas, Bruce Portzer and Phil Bytheway of the Seattle area. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Gregg A. Calkin of St. John, NB, an active NRC'er in the early 1960s, sent this photo of his DX den to John Callarman.
Click to see picture John Callarman can't recall who sent him a package of pictures from the NRC Buffalo convention in 1964. Here are a couple of New York State locals some NRC'ers may remember, Christ Maslen, left, and Stef Kreiger.
Click to see picture Don Kenney of California was one of the regulars at the Hearts table at DX conventions. Here, John Callarman's camera caught him reacting to a play at the IRCA Columbus 1973 convention. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Gordon Nelson, of Waterstown, Mass., second from right, shared his technical wizardry with a number of DX'ers across the continent at the NRC convention in Eugene, Oregon, in 1967. Amateur photographer John Callarman's memory isn't certain on all the identities, but believes the DX'er on the left is Clarence Freeman of Clearlake Highlands, Calif., with DX'er Mike Northam of Oregon, Nelson, and Don Kenney of California engaging in the conversation. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Harry J. Hibbard of New Bedford, Mass., sent this picture of his DX den to John Callarman in the early 1960s. The first box loop plans published in the NRC bulletin, pre-Gordon Nelson, came from Harry. Photo by John Callarman.
Click to see picture Someone sent some Buffalo 1964 convention pictures to John Callarman shortly after the convention. Among those in attendance were Ontario DX'er James Warner, left, and Pete Hansen, one of the "Croton Kids" who published the bulletin for a year in the late 1950s during Hal Wagner's tenure as executive secretary. Hansen is examining a foreign object ... a Dr. Pepper bottle. Veteran Massachusetts DX'er Stan Morss was notorious as a Dr. Pepper fan, and stocked up on a large supply at the Amarillo convention in 1961. The drink was not available in Massachusetts in the '60s.
Click to see picture Noted linguist and DX'er, Richard Wood, left, a native of Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, who taught at several universities in the United States, as well as in Norway and Saudi Arabia, discusses DX issues at the 1979 NRC convention in St. Louis with Ronald F. Schatz, Miami DX'er, who kept tabs on stations in Cuba for DX hobbyists. John Callarman took the picture.
Click to see picture WOKV 690 Jacksonville, FL's Baldwin, FL night plant, 10kw, looking basically NNW-erly on US Rt 90. This produces a cigar shaped patern to the east into Jacksonville from the western hinterlands of Duval County. A couple of miles to the west is the Baker County Line. Photo By Ron Gitschier - September 2001.
Click to see picture ZVBI 780 Oct 1999. Sign from across harbor at Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. ZBVI "The AM Advantage". Photo By Ron Gitschier.
Click to see picture My typical DX set up while abroad. Beach at Roosevelt Roads Naval Station, Puerto Rico. I bring my Radio Shack DX-398, Awia AM/FM digitally tuned walkman-style radiocassette recorder and also a Sony SRF-A1 AM Stereo Walkman. I can patch either the Sony Walkman or the line out of the DX-398 into the Awia's mic input line using a stereo mini plug double male patch cord. Also I have a compact microphone to dictate information - setting up information when recording a station ID or aircheck onto cassette with the Awia... Many recommended I use a beverage next to my antenna for better reception, or something like that... From my experience it leads to fuzzy reception. Photo By Ron Gitschier.
Click to see picture ZBVI tower from across Road Town Harbor, Oct 1999. Photo By Ron Gitschier.
Click to see picture Ron paying WKXL 1450 a visit on November 2001.
Click to see picture Randall Kane and I took the night train from Boston to New York over the Thanksgiving weekend in 1967 to attend Ernie Cooper's annual get-together in Brooklyn. We stopped at WCBS where we found NRC'er Bob Foxworth working the console. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture WCBS' and NRC's Bob Foxworth showed off the control room to Randy Kane and amateur shutterbug John Callarman in November 1967.
Click to see picture Bob Karchevski, right, and John Callarman, who took this picture, shared the apartment in Watertown, Mass. where the NRC bulletin was published in 1967-68. Gordon Nelson is seen foreground left, Randy Kane foreground right and Phil Sullivan bowing his head following completion of another bulletin.
Click to see picture Raymond S. Moore, left; Stanwood R. Morss, behind Moore; Bob Karchevski, background, right; and Randy Kane, members of the NRC's publishing team, take a break to read the bulletin during a publishing session at the Karchevski-Callarman apartment in Watertown, Mass. in 1968. John Callarman took the picture.
Click to see picture Ruth Nelson, Gordon's wife, never did show up at the Callarman/Karchevski apartment in Watertown, Mass., during the weekly bulletin publishing sessions, but she was often on the phone. Gordon listens as Randy Kane waits. The NRC printing press turned out more than 400 copies, minimum 20 pages, of the NRC bulletin 34 times a year. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Gordon Nelson, left, and Ray Moore often debated propagation and antenna and receiver design issues during the weekly publication sessions in Watertown, Mass. in 1967-68. Stan Morss enjoyed the conversations. John Callarman did, too, but he paused to take this picture.
Click to see picture Raymond S. Moore, one of many NRC DX'ers who helped put out DX News in 1967-68 at the Watertown, Mass., apartment shared by John Callarman and Bob Karchevski, stuffs one of more than 400 envelopes that went out the night Callarman took this picture.
Click to see picture Coca Cola was not the pause that refreshes at an NRC publishing session in Watertown, Mass., in 1967-68. Here, Gordon Nelson, left and Phil Sullivan take a break during a Thursday night gathering. John Callarman photo.
Click to see picture Where was radio born? David Graupner, CEO of TM/Century writes, "Here's an interesting picture from my trip to England. This was taken in Chelmsford...where Marconi conducted his experiments...or so the locals say."
Click to see picture You've seen RF warning signs, and no trespassing signs. Here is a sign that you might see at an NRC convention next to the WNRC-AM tower system.
Click to see picture Proof that you need to check all aspects of the printing you put on your radio station vehicles. This station obviously did not check.
Click to see picture "Inside Out", artwork by the N.R.C.'s own Ginnie Lupi. This mixed media on paper piece was part of a show entitled "Women: Struggle, Survival, Triumph" at Ayer Lofts Gallery in Lowell, MA in March, 2002.
Click to see picture Seen in this photocopied picture dated 1933 is, (front row): C. S. Hansell, R. J. Rostron, Carl H. Taylor, C.W. Latimer, Guglielmo Marconi, David Sarnoff, W. A. Winterbottom, Gaston Mathieu, and Lloyd Briggs. (Back Row): B. S. Y. Clifton, David Rau, Harold H. Beverage, Harold O. Peterson, Philip S. Carter.
Click to see picture Harold H. Beverage. When you think of the Beverage Antenna, this is the man who produced the theory and design.